FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 9, 2019
Contact: Chris Rose II
Director At-Large 2, Libertarian Party of Florida
atlarge2@lpf.org

 

OCALA, Fla – Dennis Fields, Region 4 Representative for Florida Carry, became the latest Republican to switch his voter registration over to Libertarian Party of Florida Saturday.

Dennis Fields (L,) Chris Rose II (R)

Fields, an activist and an avid defender of the right to bear arms, said his party had already left him. “Republicans are now Democrats. I’m tired of the GOP screwing me without lube,” he said.

Fields’ Region 4 includes Baker, Clay, Duval, Flagler, Putnam, Nassau, and St. Johns Counties.

Fields, along with LPF Director At-Large 2 Chris Rose II and other LPF members attended an open-carry event here this weekend. A hot topic of the event was the 2018 Republican-dominated Florida Legislature’s passing of Senate Bill 7026, which created “red flag” laws and raised the minimum age to purchase any firearm to 21.

“Dennis and I combined on all three of the protest events in Tallahassee last year,” said Rose. “The Libertarian Party of Florida was the only political Party in the State to actively oppose the passing of SB7026, from its inception in Committee, to its final passing on the Senate floor. I am overjoyed to now have Mr. Fields as a member of the LPF, and I expect we will be working a lot more together.”

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 26, 2019

Contact: Marcos Miralles,
Chairman, Libertarian Party of Florida
chair@lpf.org

Contact: Souraya Faas
sourayafaas@gmail.com

 

Souraya Faas

MIAMI – Marcos Miralles, chairman of the Libertarian Party of Florida, announced today the newest convert to the LPF, Souraya Faas, Miami-Dade County Republican Executive Committee Committeewoman for Dist. 32.

“As a Libertarian, I want to highlight the party and show people that they are Libertarians,” Faas said today. “I registered Republican since I was 18 because I thought I had to choose between one of the two major parties. But I’ve always considered myself a libertarian because I was conservative about some things, and moderate about others. I was in the Republican Liberty Caucus.”

Increasingly, politicians are choosing Libertarian to run for office. Faas joins Coconut Grove Village Councilwoman Courtney Omega as the latest

Souraya Faas with Marcos Miralles

South Florida politician to switch from Republican to Libertarian Party during the past year. In 2012, Gov. Gary Johnson left the Republican Party to run for president as a Libertarian.

Faas, 37, has been active in politics most of her life. In 2016, she ran for president as a write-in Independent in 2016, but lost her lawsuit to get on the ballot in Texas. At the time, she was the youngest person and the first person of Arab descent to run for the office. Last year, she made a bid for U.S. Congress, but lost to incumbent Rep. Carlos Curbelo in the Republican Primary.

During the 2018 campaign, Faas denounced the U.S. intervention in the Syrian War and praised a House Democrat who opposed U.S. military involvement.

“Time and time again we see history repeating itself where, in the name of freedom and peace, wars have been provoked and fought for special interests,” she wrote in a RT op ed piece last year.[1]

“The Libertarian Party is a place where diversity is valued and a place where everyone works together to enhance our community’s quality of life,” Miralles said.

Faas says she will continue to seek public office. “I feel like people have lost the perception of what it’s like to be a politician,” Faas said to the Miami Herald last year. [2]

“Politicians are no longer what they used to be: for the people,” she said today. “They are more worried about getting re-elected and listening to special interests than they are about listening to the people.”

 

– By J. Mark Barfield, Staff Writer

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[1] Divide & conquer: America’s blueprint for ‘world peace’ simply a roadmap to disaster

[2] Miami congressional candidate says chemical attacks in Syria were staged

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Feb. 1, 2019
Contact: Marcos Miralles,
Chairman, Libertarian Party of Florida
chair@lpf.org

MIAMI – In the Jan. 31 Raw Story article titled, “WATCH: Libertarian activist stalks and harasses county-employed janitor until he cries and quits,” the use of the word “libertarian” does not accurately convey the beliefs of the Libertarian Party of Florida.

The subject of the article, Ian McGuire of Charlotte County, Fla., is described as a “libertarian activist” in the caption and a “libertarian first amendment ‘auditor’ ” in the lede. Mr. McGuire’s filmed anti-government exploits has thousands of YouTube followers. Mr. McGuire came to notoriety in 2017 appearing at the Charlotte County Sheriff’s Offices shouting “God bless the shooter. It’s a good thing he did.” He was also seen wearing a sign that said, “2 cops dead in Orlando, God bless the shooter.” These comments refer to the accused murderer of two law enforcement officers in Orange County that year.


Ian McGuire seen standing outside CCSO days after murders

In the Raw Story article, Mr. McGuire is quoted confronting a Charlotte County employee, accusing him of filming Mr. McGuire. The janitor became upset, and reportedly resigned. The quotes came from Mr. McGuire’s own YouTube video of the confrontation. Mr. McGuire’s account was subsequently suspended.

To clarify, Mr. McGuire is not a registered Libertarian Party voter. Mr. McGuire is registered with the Charlotte County Supervisor of Elections as an NPA – “No Party Affiliation.”

The differences between “libertarian” thinking and Libertarian Party members are often confused. To the minds of many, they are one and the same. They are not. While there are always overlaps of philosophy in many belief systems, many of Mr. McGuire’s beliefs do not represent Libertarianism.

Certainly, Libertarian Party members embrace free speech wholeheartedly. To that end, Mr. McGuire is free to film any public activity and any public employee. Libertarians also oppose violence for any reason other than self-defense. Indeed, party members are asked to pledge their support the NAP – the “Non-Aggression Principle.” This policy eschews any act of aggression except in preservation of life or property. Mr. McGuire’s comments and actions endorse violence and violent acts. These are not even “libertarian,” a principle of responsible freedom of choice, let alone Libertarian.

Everyone who believes in life, liberty and the pursuit of freedom is encouraged to join the Libertarian Party – including libertarians.

Marcos Miralles, Chairman,
Libertarian Party of Florida

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 14, 2018
Contact: Marcos Miralles,
Chairman, Libertarian Party of Florida
chair@lpf.org

MIAMI – With more than a half million votes cast for Florida Libertarians this week, state Chairman Marcos Miralles said the election was a success.

Miralles

“The contributions from our volunteers and our donors have created an environment for the Libertarian Party of Florida to provide great results!” Miralles said today. “This year, Florida became the state with the most elected Libertarians in the United States and added to that number on election day to continue to not only be an example for other Libertarian state parties to learn from but also in giving our communities a voice for those who feel unheard.”

Unofficial results from Tuesday showed 557,142 votes were cast for Libertarian candidates, providing us with the following victories:

  • Michael Cassidy – Clay Soil and Water Conservation District Board.

Chipman (and family)

  • James Chipman – Bartram Springs Community Development District in Duval County.
  • Shawn Elliott – Indian River County Soil and Water Conservation District Board.
  • Larry Allen Schneck – Osceola County Soil and Water Conservation District Seat 3

 

These Libertarians were elected without opposition:

  • Wayne Barricklow – Martin County Soil & Water Conservation District 5
  • Martha Bueno – West Kendall Community Council
  • Samantha Bruntjen – Collier County Soil & Water Conservation District Group 3
  • David DeForest – Charlotte County Soil & Water Conservation District 2
  • Rob Tolp – Collier County Soil & Water Conservation District Group 5
  • Jose Vigoreaux Jr. – South Dade Soil & Water Conservation District, Seat 5
  • Thomas Warfel – Hamilton County Soil & Water Conservation District, Seat 1
  • Jeremy Weinstock – South Dade Soil & Water Conservation District, Seat 3

 

Elliott attributed his success to community activism. “Why did I win? My activism and involvement in my community,” he said. “It’s crucial.”

Elliott

Cassidy admitted his win caught him by surprise. “I was definitely not expecting a win,” said Cassidy. “My opponent Richard Russell had great success at the position, so he had the edge in experience and knowledge.”

“I wasn’t able to advertise, based on the way that I filed,” said Cassidy. “I’m learning to run before I can walk when it comes to politics. I relied on personal contacts, word of mouth and networking with people in my immediate area.”

Elliott and Cassidy said they plan to make the Libertarian voice heard.

“My plans are to make sure we are operating efficiently with as little drain on the taxpayer as possible,” Elliott said.

Cassidy

“I aim to push the Clay Soil and Water Board into the tech age while maintaining the integrity of the seat,” said Cassidy.

Miralles said the Libertarian voice is growing. “Libertarians are now in positions to lead our communities, while also managing millions of dollars in municipal budgets. You wanted a viable third Party? Now you’ve got one.”

Miralles said recruiting for 2020 is underway. This past weekend, Councilwoman Courtney Omega of the Coconut Grove Village Council, announced her bid for U.S. House District 24.

Counties have until Nov. 18 to submit their final results to the Florida Department of State Division of Elections. Several counties are performing recounts, including hand counts.

– By J. Mark Barfield, Staff Writer

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 28, 2018
Contact: Marcos Miralles,
Chairman, Libertarian Party of Florida
chair@lpf.org

MIAMI – The Florida Lobbying Restrictions Amendment would significantly restrict former officials’ ability to lobby current government lawmakers. Let’s take a look at it.

Lobbying and Abuse of Office by Public Officers (Proposal 39) – Expands current restrictions on lobbying for compensation by former public officers; creates restrictions on lobbying for compensation by serving public officers and former justices and judges; provides exceptions; prohibits abuse of a public position by public officers and employees to obtain a personal benefit.

THE LIBERTARIAN PARTY OF FLORIDA PLATFORM

PREAMBLE
Libertarians seek a society based on personal liberty and responsibility—a society in which all individuals are sovereign over their own lives. This most desirable method of organizing society is the natural order that arises when the unalienable rights of individuals to life, liberty and property ownership are respected and protected.

People have the right to engage in any activity that is peaceful and honest, and pursue happiness in whatever manner they choose so long as they do not forcibly or fraudulently interfere with the equal rights of others. Libertarians welcome the peace, prosperity, and diversity that freedom brings

I. STATE GOVERNMENT
4. We support Equality under the Law, and condemn any law that either rewards or punishes any individual based on race, ethnicity, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation3, or any other group identification. Each person has the same inalienable rights. It is the State’s duty to protect those rights for each individual equally.
6. We advocate a sunset law requiring an automatic end to most government offices, agencies, departments, laws, regulations, taxes, and expenditures within ten years if not reauthorized.
7. We oppose immunities for any public officials or employees for illegal acts or omissions.
8. We support complete transparency and believe it should apply to all public employees. Sunshine laws should apply to all public employees working in any public place. With modern technology virtually every person has the ability to record and report on the actions of our public officials and workers. There should be no laws prohibiting or limiting the electronic recording and reporting using any means of any public official, including law enforcement officers, while performing their duties.

DISCUSSION

Currently, former Legislators and other state officials are prevented from lobbying their colleagues for at least two years after they leave office. This Amendment would expand that term to six years. It would also expand lobbying restrictions to include many other elected city, county, and school members, along with many unelected senior officials.
We recommend NO because this would dramatically decrease private individuals’ rights to promote causes. We would like to see much greater transparency in lobbying so we all know who and what influences participation in the state’s lawmaking process. This is not the correct way to accomplish this.
> By J. Mark Barfield, Staff Writer

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sept. 27, 2018

Contact: Marcos Miralles,
Chairman, Libertarian Party of Florida
chair@lpf.org

 

MIAMI – This Amendment would require a statewide vote on each and every new casino in Florida, regardless of the community they are proposed. Let’s take a look at it a bit closer.

Voter Control of Gambling in Florida – This amendment ensures that Florida voters shall have the exclusive right to decide whether to authorize casino gambling by requiring that in order for casino gambling to be authorized under Florida law, it must be approved by Florida voters pursuant to Article XI, Section 3 of the Florida Constitution. Affects articles X and XI. Defines casino gambling and clarifies that this amendment does not conflict with federal law regarding state/tribal compacts.

LIBERTARIAN PARTY OF FLORIDA PLATFORM

PREAMBLE

Libertarians seek a society based on personal liberty and responsibility—a society in which all individuals are sovereign over their own lives. This most desirable method of organizing society is the natural order that arises when the unalienable rights of individuals to life, liberty and property ownership are respected and protected.

People have the right to engage in any activity that is peaceful and honest, and pursue happiness in whatever manner they choose so long as they do not forcibly or fraudulently interfere with the equal rights of others. Libertarians welcome the peace, prosperity, and diversity that freedom brings.

 

V. VICE LAWS

  1. Government should confine itself to protecting individuals from aggression, coercion and deceit. We oppose all laws and regulations that attempt to protect individuals from the consequences of their own behavior. While not necessarily condoning such activities, we advocate the repeal of all laws criminalizing gambling, possession and sale of drugs, and sexual relations between consenting adults. All those presently incarcerated or ever convicted solely for the commission of these victimless crimes should be pardoned and their records expunged.

 

DISCUSSION

On the surface of it, Amendment 3 looks great. Shouldn’t we, the citizens, make personal choices about how we choose to live our lives; how we choose to spend our money? Whether we choose to gamble, go to a movie or rent a canoe, we own our money and we own the choice how to spend it. That’s what this amendment should be saying. It doesn’t.

If approved by the voters this November, Amendment 3 allows voters across the state to remove the choice from local citizens seeking a new casino in their community. This Amendment requires a statewide vote, a process that often takes years and may cost millions of dollars. Such a process drives up the costs to establish a casino in a community, driving down the incentive to even pursue them. Even if a local community seeks the construction jobs, operations jobs and service jobs produced by a casino, voters from throughout the state can stop them.

Amendment 3 protects gambling on Seminole tribal lands. Not surprisingly, the Seminole Tribe of Florida is one of the top financiers for this Amendment. This suggests they want to preserve their near-exclusive rights to offer casinos to the public while making it very hard for any other community to have that choice.

The Libertarian Party of Florida believes gambling is a personal choice which should be freely available in communities that desire it and where business-people choose to provide that opportunity. In and of itself, gambling is not harmful to others. There are some folks who have addiction issues or some with criminal intent, but providing and participating in gambling is a free-will choice of responsible adults. This Amendment serves to establish major pitfalls in the roadway to accessible and commercially-viable gambling in the state of Florida. In effect, it serves to constrain gambling, not allow citizens to choose to have it. Therefore, we recommend a NO vote on Amendment 3.

– By J. Mark Barfield, Staff Writer

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 20, 2018
Contact: Marcos Miralles,
Chairman, Libertarian Party of Florida
chair@lpf.org

 

MIAMI – If approved, the “State and Local Government Structure Amendment” would make four separate unrelated changes to the Florida Constitution “bundled” together into a single vote. We oppose all four so recommend a NO vote for this Amendment.

Let’s take a brief look at each one:

 

Department of Veterans’ Affairs (Proposal 9) – Requires legislature to retain department of veterans’ affairs.

Libertarian Party of Florida Platform

VIII. WELFARE and CHARITY

    Providing for the needy by forcibly taxing others is contrary to the legitimate function of government, which is to protect the rights of everyone. Disbursing charity from a welfare system costs society more than it gains. It is inefficient, open to fraud and abuse, and creates resentment. Traditional, voluntary sources of emergency support from families, churches, and private charities have always been more humane, more effective, and willingly borne by the givers. Therefore, until the income tax is repealed, we advocate dollar-for-dollar tax credits for all charitable contributions to encourage a transition from public welfare to private support.

DISCUSSION

If approved, this proposal would make the Florida Department of Veteran’s Affairs permanent, removing the Legislature’s and your choices. Other options may come available or finances become strained, but this would require you to pay for it. It would also place the Governor and Cabinet at the head of the Department, further distancing voters. We agree our veterans deserve our compassion and support, but we disagree making any bureaucracy permanent. We oppose this proposal.

 

Counties; Schedule to Article VIII (Proposal 13) – Ensures election of sheriffs, property appraisers, supervisors of elections, tax collectors, and clerks of court in all counties; removes county charters’ ability to abolish, change term, transfer duties, or eliminate election of these offices.

Libertarian Party of Florida Platform

PREAMBLE

    Libertarians seek a society based on personal liberty and responsibility—a society in which all individuals are sovereign over their own lives. This most desirable method of organizing society is the natural order that arises when the unalienable rights of individuals to life, liberty and property ownership are respected and protected.
    People have the right to engage in any activity that is peaceful and honest, and pursue happiness in whatever manner they choose so long as they do not forcibly or fraudulently interfere with the equal rights of others. Libertarians welcome the peace, prosperity, and diversity that freedom brings.

DISCUSSION

This obscurely-named proposal might be the most dangerous of the four. If this Amendment is approved, residents who choose to govern themselves would lose much of that choice. It would remove their ability to create alternatives to the offices of the Sheriff, Tax Collector, Property Appraiser, Supervisor of Elections and Clerk of Circuit Court. Voters in some Charter counties chose to make those positions part of their county government rather than separate offices. This amendment would force voters in those counties to shift control to autonomous officers. While the need for those responsibilities are debatable, we believe choice should always remain in the control of the local voter, not state government. We would vote NO for this proposal if we could.

 

Office of Domestic Security and Counter-Terrorism (Proposal 26) – Creates office of domestic security and counterterrorism within department of law enforcement.

Libertarian Party of Florida Platform

I. STATE GOVERNMENT

  1. We advocate a sunset law requiring an automatic end to most government offices, agencies, departments, laws, regulations, taxes, and expenditures within ten years if not reauthorized. We oppose the participation by the state of Florida in the Real ID Act or similar federal identification database mandates.
  1. Privacy – Just as it is true that the only economic situation consistent with individual rights is the free market, so is it also true that life, liberty and happiness cannot prosper under continuous state surveillance. The LPF opposes the use by the state of people or technology to monitor, account for, and keep Floridians under surveillance, especially where there is no evidence of criminal behavior, and thereby restrict the normal interaction of peoples. The LPF opposes passive, yet compulsory, surveillance legislation, such as laws that require individuals and businesses to report legal activities without evidence of criminal acts. The first, second, fourth, fifth and fourteenth amendments to the Constitution are all threatened by unfettered state surveillance. The LPF supports an amendment to the Constitution of the United States to protect the right of privacy of all citizens, a right that is implied throughout that document, so as to8 defend individuals from state intrusion, to limit state intervention in private lives, and allow the free exercise of liberty away from the overbearing power of government.
  2. We oppose compulsory surveillance without evidence of criminal acts. We support the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States and Art. I, Sect. 23 of the Florida Constitution, which protects the rights of privacy of all people.

 

DISCUSSION

This proposal creates a state Office of Domestic Security and Counter-Terrorism within the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. The Office must provide support for prosecutors and federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies investigating or analyzing attempted acts of terrorism or terrorism. This will require paying for staff, vehicles, equipment and operational expenses at regional offices.

Acts of terrorism are extreme acts of violence against a society and should be prosecuted to the fullest. However, we are against this proposal because we oppose growth of government bureaucracy and growth of government intrusion.

 

Sessions of the legislature (Proposal 103) – The Florida Legislature would convene for regular session on the second Tuesday after the first Monday in January of each even-numbered year.

Libertarian Party of Florida Platform

    N / A

DISCUSSION

This proposal would require the legislature to convene the regular legislative session on the second Tuesday of January of even-numbered years. Currently, there is no law fixing the date for the Regular Session to convene in even numbered years. We would vote NO for this proposal as it forces state lawmakers to politic and meet in Tallahassee during the holiday season rather than spend the time with their families.

 

CONCLUSION

The Libertarian Party of Florida applauds citizens who come forward to recommend changes to their Constitution, but Amendment 10 and others show how horribly broken this system has become. There’s got to be a better way.

The LPF urges voters to reform the FCRC to assure citizens, not politicians, elect the “super-majority” of its members. The LPF urges “bundling” of proposals be discontinued. All unique proposals should be presented separately so voters can make decisions they desire, not those that are steered by political appointees.

– J. Mark Barfield, Staff Writer

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